Liatris spicata – Dense Blazingstar
Liatris spicata – Dense Blazingstar

Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun. Somewhat tolerant of poor soils, but prefers moist, fertile ones and generally performs better in moist soils than most other species of Liatris. Intolerant of wet soils in winter. Tolerant of summer heat and humidity. May be grown from seed, but is slow to establish.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Blazing star (also commonly called dense blazing star or marsh blazing star) is a tall, upright, clump-forming perennial which is native to moist low grounds, meadows and marsh margins. In Missouri, it has only been found in Oregon County on the Arkansas border (Steyermark). It typically grows 2-4′ tall in cultivation, but can reach a height of 6′ in some parts of its native habitat. Features terminal spikes (6-12″ long) of sessile, rounded, fluffy, deep purple flower heads (each to 3/4″ across) appearing atop rigid, erect, leafy flower stalks. One or more stalks arise from a basal tuft of narrow, grass-like, medium green leaves (to 12″ long). Stem leaves gradually decrease in size toward the top. Blooms in summer. Liatris belongs to the aster family, with each flower head having only fluffy disk flowers (resembling “blazing stars”) and no ray flowers. The feathery flower heads of liatris give rise to another common name of gayfeather. See also L. spicata‘Kobold’ which is a popular compact cultivar that is less likely to need staking than the species.

 

Available May – Mid May 2017

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Liatris squarrosa –Scaly Blazingstar
Liatris squarrosa –Scaly Blazingstar

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun. Somewhat tolerant of poor soils, but prefers moist, fertile ones and generally performs better in moist soils than most other species of Liatris. Intolerant of wet soils in winter. Tolerant of summer heat and humidity. May be grown from seed, but is slow to establish.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Liatris spicata, commonly called blazing star, dense blazing star or marsh blazing star, is a tall, upright, clump-forming perennial which is native to moist low grounds, meadows and marsh margins.  It typically grows 2-4′ tall in cultivation, but can reach a height of 6′ in some parts of its native habitat. Features terminal spikes (6-12″ long) of sessile, rounded, fluffy, deep purple flower heads (each to 3/4″ across) appearing atop rigid, erect, leafy flower stalks. One or more stalks arise from a basal tuft of narrow, grass-like, medium green leaves (to 12″ long). Stem leaves gradually decrease in size toward the top. Blooms in summer. Liatris belongs to the aster family, with each flower head having only fluffy disk flowers (resembling “blazing stars”) and no ray flowers. The feathery flower heads of liatris give rise to another common name of gayfeather.

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Lindera benzoin – Spicebush
Lindera benzoin – Spicebush

Spicebush is a deciduous shrub with a broad, rounded habit which typically grows 6-12′ (less frequently to 15′) high in moist locations in bottomlands, woods, ravines, valleys and along streams. Clusters of tiny, apetulous, aromatic, greenish-yellow flowers bloom along the branches in early spring before the foliage emerges. Dioecious (male and female flowers on separate plants), with the male flowers being larger and showier than the female ones. Flowers of female plants give way to bright red drupes (to 1/2″ long) which mature in fall and are attractive to birds. Female plants need a male pollinator in order to set fruit, however. Drupes are very attractive, but are largely hidden by the foliage until the leaves drop. Thick, oblong-obovate, light green leaves (to 5″ long) turn an attractive yellow in autumn. Leaves are aromatic when crushed. The larva (caterpillar) of the spicebush swallowtail butterfly feeds on the leaves of this shrub.Lindera is named for the Swedish botanist, Johann Lindler.

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Mimulus ringens – Monkeyflower
Mimulus ringens – Monkeyflower

This perennial plant is 1-3′ tall, branching occasionally to frequently. The light green stems are glabrous and bluntly 4-angled, but they are not conspicuously winged. The opposite leaves are up to 4″ long and 1″ across; they are light to medium green, lanceolate or elliptic-oblanceolate in shape, glabrous, and serrated to sparingly serrated along their margins. The leaves are sessile or they clasp the stems; petioles are absent. Leaf bases are round to slightly cordate, while their tips are slender and pointed. Individual flowers develop from the leaf axils of the middle to upper stems. These flowers are about 1″ long, and they have two-lipped corollas that are usually pale blue-violet (less often pink or white).

Available May – Mid May 2015

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Monarda Balmy Purple
Monarda Balmy Purple

Excellent early-flowering, compact monarda. Dwarf variety is deer and rabbit resistant, as well as mildew resistant. Pollinator power! Native cultivars with heat and drought tolerance in North America. True, uniform series is tops in powdery mildew resistance. Full, compact plants … Read More

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Monarda Balmy Rose
Monarda Balmy Rose

Excellent early-flowering, compact monarda. Dwarf variety is deer and rabbit resistant, as well as mildew resistant. Pollinator power! Native cultivars with heat and drought tolerance in North America. True, uniform series is tops in powdery mildew resistance. Full, compact plants … Read More

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Penstemon hirsutus – Penstemon
Penstemon hirsutus – Penstemon

Erect, hairy stems, usually several from the same rhizome, are 16-24 in. tall. Leaves are oblong. A woolly-stemmed plant with open, stalked clusters of lavender, trumpet-shaped flowers with white lips. The tubular, lipped flowers are very slender, about an inch long, and pale-violet flowers. The mouth is nearly closed by the arched base of the lower lip.

The Beardtongues are a very large group, and taxonomically so complex that separating the species is often difficult. This species is readily distinguished, however, by the downy nature of the stem. The common and scientific names refer to the tufted sterile stamen.

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Phlox ‘Flame Blue’
Phlox ‘Flame Blue’

Fragrant white flowers are brushed with blue. Clusters of pretty blooms appear in midsummer above compact green foliage.

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Phlox ‘Flame White with Eye’
Phlox ‘Flame White with Eye’

Butterflies and hummingbirds love Flame® ‘White Eye’! Fragrant, snow white flowers with magenta eyes bloom in midsummer above compact green foliage.

 
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Phlox paniculata Bright Eyes
Phlox paniculata Bright Eyes

Most popular bicolor, pale pink with a crimson eye.  Fragrant blooms are pale pink with crimson eye.

‘Bright Eyes’

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Phlox paniculata Red Super
Phlox paniculata Red Super

So intense that on a sunny day it almost hurts your eyes. Compared to ‘Red Riding Hood’, this is about 8″ taller, and the red is deeper, and a touch more of crimson. As with most of the strongly colored phlox, there is a lot of dark pigmentation of the leaves and flower buds. Not much troubled by mildew.

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Rudbeckia Fulgida Goldsturm
Rudbeckia fulgida – ‘Goldsturm’ Black-eyed Susan

A garden classic with bold texture and upright habit. Bright gold petals with a deep brown cone highlight the garden in late summer. Each flower may last up to two weeks! Makes a wonderful and long lasting cut flower. Provides seeds in the winter for birds and nectar for butterflies. Beautiful and versatile, outstanding in mass plantings as well as perennial borders, meadows and prairie gardens.

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm' has been selected by the Perennial Plant Association as the 1999 Perennial Plant of the Year. Acclaimed internationally as one of the most popular perennials for the past fifty years, its bright golden-yellow flowers shine in gardens worldwide. In 1937 Heinrich Hagemann observed a glorious stand of Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii at Gebrueder Schuetz's nursery in the Czech Republic. Recognizing the superiority over other commonly-grown Rudbeckia species, Hagemann convinced his employer Karl Foerster of Potsdam, Germany to propagate his discovery. World War II interfered with the planned debut of the plant and it was not until 1949 that the triumphant success of Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii renamed 'Goldsturm' began. 'Goldsturm' translates to English as “gold storm.” Heinrich Hagemann, although retired, maintains an active interest in his company, the world-renowned Hagemann Staudenkulturen. A member of the Asteraceae (Compositae) family, orange coneflower or black-eyed Susan has a native range from New Jersey west to Illinois. 'Goldsturm' orange coneflower is significant in its compact habit and 1-2-inch golden-yellow petals which encircle a nearly black cone of disk flowers. The leaves are coarse, dark green lanceolate to ovate, 3-6 inches long; stem leaves are smaller, almost bract-like. The “gold storm” blankets the tops of 18-30-inch tall plants from mid-July to October. Plant width is 24 inches.

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