Amorpha canescens – Leadplant
Amorpha canescens – Leadplant

Host Plant – Silver Spotted Skipper

This is a lovely, and very long lived shrub of the prairie. The deep purple flower spikes rise above the silver-gray foliage to create a striking bloom display in June. The very deep taproot allows this plant to be very drought tolerant. Butterflies are attracted.

Available May – Mid May

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Baptisia australis – Blue False Indigo
Baptisia australis – Blue False Indigo

Wild Indigo Duskywing / Eastern Tailed-Blue / Orange Sulphur / Clouded Sulphur / Frosted Elfin / Hoary Edge

Blue spikes of pea-shaped flowers resemble the tall racemes of lupines in May and early June. A slow to mature, but very rewarding native garden perennial. Found in open woods, river banks and sandy floodplains, New York to Nebraska to Georgia.

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Echinacea – Cheyenne Spirit
Echinacea – Cheyenne Spirit
First year flowering perennial
Mix of colors from purple, pink, red and orange tones to lighter yellows, creams and whites
Well-branched and floriferous
All-America Selections Winner, 2013
Recipient of Europe’s FleuroSelect Gold Medal award
Introduced by Ball Seed/Kieft Seed

A 2013 All-America Selection Award Winner, and for good reason – they’re durable, easy to grow and gorgeous! A delightful mix of colors from rich purples, pinks, reds and oranges to lighter yellows, creams and whites makes a bold statement in a perennial border, butterfly garden or patio container. Drought tolerant and low maintenance, these coneflowers do not require deadheading to maintain their flower power! The spent blooms turn to seeds, providing winter food for songbirds and architectural interest.

Brilliant colour range is available for the first time from seed. Excellent branching puts more flowers on every plant. First-year flowering in both gallons and quarts. Cheyenne Spirit features sought-after shades of red, orange, purple, scarlet, cream, yellow and white – all now available from economical seed! Excellent genetics bring you extremely well-branched plants for more flowers on every plant – high-impact landscapes and fuller looking containers. This great branching also saves on chemical costs usually required to obtain a quality plant. Suitable for gallons and quarts, Cheyenne Spirit brings opportunities to offer product at various price points for differing market and retailer needs. It is also possible to plant one per quart to separate colours, if desired. This first year-flowering perennial is also suitable for traditional perennial production, making it easy for programmable production based upon grower conditions and methods. A Fleuroselect Gold Medal Winner. A 2013 European and Rest of World Introduction. A 2014 North America introduction

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Eutrochium purpureum – Purple Joe Pye Weed
Eutrochium purpureum – Purple Joe Pye Weed

Easily grown in average, medium moisture soils in full sun to part shade. Prefers moist, fertile, humusy soils which do not dry out. Cut plants to the ground in late winter. Best propagated by stem cuttings. This species generally grows … Read More

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Senna hebecarpa – Wild Senna
Senna hebecarpa – Wild Senna

Host Plant – Sulphur, Clouded Sulphur, Orange Sulphur

Wild Senna is a versatile plant that we think deserves more recognition as a great choice for garden or restoration projects. Its lovely, bright yellow flowers bloom July-August, attracting many bees and butterflies. Autumn brings beautiful leaf colors and the formation of long black pods with seeds favored by larger birds like wild turkeys. A horizontal root system provides strength against winds, allowing the plant’s stately (4-6′) beauty to be appreciated even after the storm. Some gardeners use this sun-loving plant to form a hedge.

It is virtually indistinguishable from its relative, Maryland Senna (Senna marilandica) until the two species have ripe seeds. The Wild Senna will readily open its pod and the seeds will fall out, whereas the Maryland Senna seed pods will stay tightly closed.  Other than this, it is very hard to tell the two species apart.

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Spigelia marilandica – Indian Pink
Spigelia marilandica – Indian Pink

Indian pink or woodland pinkroot

One of the most striking and beautiful of our native perennials, Indian pink’s summer flowers are brilliant red and tubular with canary yellow throats. A very hardy plant, though it is best planted by the end of July for reliable success in gardens and containers. A favorite of butterflies and hummingbirds, it is at home in the bright woodland or shaded border.

Indian pink Interesting Notes

Indian pink is a long-lived perennial that brings stunning color to the summer garden. Vivid red tubular flowers borne in terminal clusters open to expose a chartreuse yellow interior, reminiscent of a firecracker exploding. This perennial produces its primary display in early summer and flowers sporadically through the remainder of the growing season. It can grow to nearly 2’ tall and wide. Indian pink is an adaptable species, but does prefer neutral, well-drained soils to develop its best displays. The bright flowers attract hummingbirds and brighten the woodland edge or perennial border. Spigelia marilandica combines well with Dryopteris intermediaChrysogonum virginianumLilium superbum, and Aquilegia canadensis. – Mt. Cuba Center

If this isn’t the region’s most beautiful native, then I don’t know who is…any votes for Elvis or Dolly? This exquisite woodland perennial makes a dainty-looking 12″ wide clump of 2′ tall stalks clothed with nondescript green foliage. In late spring, Spigelia marilandica clumps are topped with dozens of stalks of spectacular up-facing, bright red, tubular flowers with a dramatically contrasting, yellow center…a hummingbird favorite. Spigelia marilandica, which improves with age, is a true garden show-stopper! We have found that it grows equally well in full sun or light shade, as well as in very moist or bone-dry soils. – Plant Delights Nursery

Although called Indian Pink, this plant, Spigelia marilandica, actually has tubular flowers that are bright crimson with a bright yellow lining. It is under-used by hummingbird gardeners but is an excellent plant for a yard with tall established trees that cast light shade beneath them. Indian Pink comes up quite late in the spring, so mark the planting spot to avoid accidentally over-planting it. It is a low-growing plant the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds find easily as they scout the landscape for food sources. – Operation RubyThroat

Folklore: Used by the Cherokee and other Native American tribes as a ritual and ceremonial herb to induce visions and foretell the future.

Spigelia marilandica Growing and Maintenance Tips

Grow in partial to full shade in rich soil with high organic content. A very hardy plant, though it is best planted by the end of July for reliable success in gardens and containers. Prefers not to be transplanted once established.

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